www.gazette.education.govt.nz

Saturday 22 July 2017

Call for submissions to help prepare our kids for the future

In response to the fast-evolving digital environment, new Digital Technologies| Hangarau Matihiko (DT | HM) curriculum content has been drafted. Submissions are now welcome on this content.

New Zealand is a digital nation. Digital technologies are transforming how we live – shaping our homes, our schools, our workplaces, and changing the way that we interact with each other and live our everyday lives.

Our education system needs to change how we prepare our children and young people to participate, create and thrive in this fast-evolving digital world.

To ensure the New Zealand curriculum is robust enough to equip young people for the 21st century, new Digital Technologies | Hangarau Matihiko (DT | HM) curriculum content has been drafted. The Ministry of Education is now calling for submissions on the draft curriculum content.

DT | HM will be included in The New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa from 2018 from year 1. It has been developed by the Ministry with the help of curriculum experts, teachers and industry partners. The strengthened curriculum enables students to do more than just use digital technology; it will support students to build computer programmes, create digital content and design digital devices.

“From smart devices in our homes to increased automation in industry, our education system needs to respond so that our children and young people are well prepared to participate, create and thrive in this fast-evolving digital world,” says Ellen MacGregor-Reid, Deputy Secretary of Early Learning and Student Achievement.

“The technology industry has an almost insatiable appetite for people with the right skills to drive digital innovation and strengthen New Zealand’s potential for economic growth. Our education system needs to increase the number of students leaving school and kura with these specialist digital skills.”

The DT | HM curriculum will provide a clear picture of what learning and progress in digital technologies looks like to guide teachers and principals when designing learning programmes and monitoring student performance. Māori values and knowledge inform concepts of digital technologies in Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

The consultation process enables educators, business/industry, parents, families and whānau to help the Ministry of Education in forming the final content of the curriculum. The Ministry will work with education and business sectors to ensure the new content will be effectively integrated into existing programmes.

“Through our partnership with leading curriculum and technology experts across the country, we are able to determine the shape and content of this curriculum and identify the key technological areas that provide the clearest framework for illustrating student progression,” says Ellen.

The consultation process will run until 31 August. There will be opportunities at workshops around the country to learn more and provide feedback over July and August 2017.

Visit https://education.govt.nz/digital-technology-consultation for more information and to make a submission.